Dinner: Bangers and Mashed

Having full fat sausage is a treat because I usually eat chicken or turkey sausage just because pork sausage is heavy and can make me have a bit of a stomach ache.  The only exception to that rule is when having English sausage – Bangers.  I have an English market in town where bangers are made in house and are authentic to the bangers sold and served in England.
Last time I picked up some bangers, I opted for the thinner cased pork sausage. They’re also sold in the classic large banger form, but I find these are easier to cook and they can go further because you get more sausages in a pound package than you do with the regular sized sausages.
Growing up we always had bangers with macaroni and cheese – but since my boyfriend is not a fan of mac & cheese I opted to make garlic mashed potatoes to pair with peas. Considering this is the first time I’ve had bangers with mashed I was quite pleased with the dish. Delicious, simple and overall tasty.
The whole meal was 12 points plus. Definitely worth it!

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Jamaican Boiled Dumplings

Dumplings come in many different forms … but the only form I enjoy them in, is this one. Jamaican Boiled Dumplings are made from very simple ingredients, but the trick behind Jamaican dumplings is kneading the dough. The dough has to be kneaded, by hand, until the dough is hard and firm. Once kneaded, the dumplings are boiled in salted water and eaten with either butter, stewed cabbage, stewed meats or they can even be incorporated into soups/stews.
I realize there’s no “real” nutritional value to them, but being a quarter Jamaican having an authentic dish is something I enjoy every once in a while.  I find soups/stews are far more enjoyable with dumplings in them because it gives the soups a new texture and it jazzes it up a bit. I love them … and I haven’t found a person who has had Jamaican dumplings that hasn’t enjoyed them.
Serves 8. 4 Points Plus Values.
Ingredients:
  • 3 cups flour (white)
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • ¾ cups water
In a large bowl mix together flour and salt.
Begin to slowly incorporate the water, about1/4 cup at first and as you add more water 2 tbsp at a time.
Using your hands knead together the flour and water mixture. As it starts to form but look “frayed” (meaning the dough is combining, but it’s not nicely formed) use your hands and knead the dough. Press it into each other with your knuckles and the pad of your hand. Don’t be afraid to “overwork” the dough because you want it to be tough, so get as rough as you want with the kneading.
When the dough is formed into a hardened ball, begin to tear off smaller pieces and roll into logs or form into small balls that you use your thumb to flatten out a bit.  Once all your dough is formed, drop the dough into boiling salted water.
Cook until the dumplings begin to float (roughly 10-15 minutes).